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St. Francis of Assisi Specialty Items
For Pope Francis Items ~ Click Here!
Patron Saint Medals, Pet Medals, Pet Bandana, Franciscan Rosaries, Indoor & Outdoor Statues, Framed Art, Key Chain, Prayer Cards, San Damiano Crosses, Tau Cross, Biography.

Patron Saint Medals

St Francis of Assisi Patron Saint Medal
1" in height
Deluxe Gift Boxed
Sterling Silver: $42.00   Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Gold Filled: $62.00   Includes 24" Gold Plated Chain
14Kt. Gold: Email for price.  Chain not included
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St Francis of Assisi Patron Saint Medal
7/8" in height
Deluxe Gift Boxed
Sterling Silver: $60.00   Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Gold Filled: $85.00   Includes 24" Gold Plated Chain
14Kt. Gold: $995.00.  Chain not included
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ENGRAVABLE
   

St Francis of Assisi Patron Saint Medal
1" in height
Deluxe Gift Boxed
Sterling Silver: $52.00   Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Gold Filled: $72.00   Includes 24" Gold Plated Chain
14Kt. Gold: Email for price.  Chain not included
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ENGRAVABLE
  

St Francis of Assisi Patron Saint Medal
1" in height
Deluxe Gift Boxed
Sterling Silver: $69.00   Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Gold Filled: $89.00   Includes 24" Gold Plated Chain
14Kt. Gold: Email for price.  Chain not included
Add to Cart
ENGRAVABLE

St Francis of Assisi Patron Saint Medal
1" in height
Deluxe Gift Boxed
Sterling Silver: $50.00   Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Gold Filled: $75.00   Includes 24" Gold Plated Chain
14Kt. Gold: $895.00.  Chain not included
Add to Cart
ENGRAVABLE
   

St. Francis Relic Medal
St. Francis of Assisi Relic Medal
Oxidized Metal with Third Class Relic
 Includes 24" Stainless Steel Chain
Size: 1" Height     Price:  $8.00
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St. Francis with Wolf Medal
St. Francis of Assisi Oxidized Medal
Beautiful Detail!   Customer Favorite!
Size: 1" Height     Price:  .50
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St. Francis Oxidized Medal
St. Francis of Assisi Oxidized Medal with Halo
Customer Favorite!
Size: 1" Height     Price:  .75
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St. Francis Pocket Piece
 Pocket Piece ~ St. Francis of Assisi
Silver Plated Coin!
1 & 1/8" in diameter, Larger than a quarter
Price: $2.00
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Pet Medals and Pet Bandana

St. Francis Dog Medal with Soil from the Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi
St. Francis Dog Medal with Soil from the Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi (in Assisi, Italy)
Enameled design on front with encapsulated Soil on back.
Size: 1" in diameter, Stainless Steel Clip
Price: $9.95
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St. Francis Cat Medal
St. Francis Cat Medal with Soil from the Basilica of St. Francis of Assisi (in Assisi, Italy)
Enameled design on front with encapsulated Soil on back.
Size: 7/8" in diameter, Stainless Steel Clip
Price: $9.95
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St. Francis Pet Medal
St. Francis Pet Medal
Price: $6.95
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Saint Francis Pet Medal
St. Francis Pet Medal
Back of Medal has area for engraving Name & Phone #
("S" ring not shown in picture but it is included)
Price: $6.95
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St. Francis Pet Medal
St. Francis Pet Medal
Back of Medal has area for engraving Name & Phone #
Price: $7.95
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St. Francis Pet Bandana
St. Francis Blessing the Animals
Pet Bandana with YOUR Pet's Name
Our exclusive line!  Makes a great Gift!
 
Bandana (no Embroidery) $19.95   Add to Cart
  
Bandana with Your Pet's name $29.95 
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Bandana is made of 100% cotton and is machine washable

Size: 22" X 16" X 16"

View another sample Bandana
   

Franciscan Rosaries
Franciscan Rosary
7 Decade Rosary, 25"
"Franciscan Crown Rosary"
(Rosary of the 7 Joys of Mary)
Miraculous Medal Center
Price: $19.00
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St. Francis Rosary
Silver Plated Rosary with Pewter St. Francis & Animals Centerpiece
7mm Black Wood Oval Beads
Double wire Lock-Linked construction ~ 24" in length
Price: $49.95
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15 Decade Rosary - Corded - Wood Beads - Customer Favorite!
15 Decade Corded Rosary
29" in length
8mm Wood Beads
Price: $35.00
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15 Decade Rosary
15 Decade Corded Rosary
40" in length
10mm Wood Beads
Price: $42.00
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Prayer Cards

St. Francis Prayer Card
Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi
Laminated Prayer Card in English
Size: 2.5" x 4.5"
Only sold in packs of 25
English Prayer Card Price: $18.75 for a pack of 25 cards
(This is equivalent to .75¢ each)
Code: 4391
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We sell only the best!

Also available in paper (non-laminated) packs of 100 for $35.00 Click Here
   

St. Francis Prayer Card with embedded Medal
St. Francis Laminated Prayer Card with embedded Medal
(Feels like a credit card)
Price: $3.25
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St. Francis Prayer Card and Medal
St. Francis Paper Prayer Card has a Matching Medal and comes inside a Plastic Pouch.
Prayer Card & Medal are removable.
Price: $1.25
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St. Francis Relic Prayer Card
St. Francis 3rd Class  Relic Prayer Card ~ Laminated
Price:$2.50
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Indoor Statues

St. Francis Statue
Florentine Collection
Resin Statue on Wood Base with Name Plate
  8" in height    Price: $35.00
12" in height    Price: $55.00
15" in height    Price: $85.00
BUY HERE
     

St. Francis with Animals Statue
St. Francis with Animals
Made of  Resin/Stone Mix
Indoor Statue
Height is 14" 
 Price: $65.00
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St. Francis with Animals Statue
St. Francis with Animals
Made of  Resin/Stone Mix
Indoor Statue
Height is 36.5"
Price: $360.00
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St. Francis with Doves Statue
48" St. Francis of Assisi Indoor Statue
Hand Painted Resin Statue
Price: $600.00
Ships in 1 - 2 days
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Outdoor Statues

St. Francis with Animals Statue
St. Francis with Animals
St. Joseph Studio Renaissance Collection
Made of  Resin/Stone Mix
OUTDOOR Statue
Height is 24"
Price: $125.00
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St. Francis with Animals Statue
St. Francis with Animals
St. Joseph Studio Renaissance Collection
Made of  Resin/Stone Mix
OUTDOOR Statue
Height is 36.5"
Price: $360.00
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24" St. Francis of Assisi Outdoor Statue
Click on picture for larger view of statue
Price: $110.00  (Colored Price)
This statue is also available in a white finish and a granite looking finish.
Granite Price: $74.00     White Price: $66.00

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This statue is molded directly from an original sculpture and cast in durable polyvinyl-resin (durable plastic). Then it is meticulously painted with multi-colored details (also available in granite-looking finish and white.)  It is lightweight and unbreakable and designed for outdoor display use but is also commonly used indoors as well.  It is hollow inside, has a plug at the bottom and can be filled with quick-crete, gravel or stone (instructions included.)  It weighs approximately 7 lbs. (unfilled) and is guaranteed for 1 1/2 years under normal conditions.
   

St. Francis Outdoor Statue with Bird Feeder
16" Kneeling St. Francis with Bird Feeder Outdoor Statue
Color Price: $110.00      Granite Price: $74.00
White Price: $66.00
This statue is also available in a white finish and a granite looking finish
Add to Cart
  
This statue is molded directly from an original sculpture and cast in durable polyvinyl-resin (durable plastic). Then it is meticulously painted with multi-colored details (also available in granite-looking finish and white.)  It is lightweight and unbreakable and designed for outdoor display use but is also commonly used indoors as well.  It is hollow inside, has a plug at the bottom and can be filled with quick-crete, gravel or stone (instructions included.)  It weighs approximately 7 lbs. (unfilled) and is guaranteed for 1 1/2 years under normal conditions.

San Damiano Crucifixes

San Damiano Cross
Available in the following sizes:
11" Price: $56   Add to Cart
17" Price: $110   Add to Cart
29" Price:  $430  Add to Cart
40" Price: $880   Add to Cart
55" Price: $1,400   Add to Cart
   

San Damiano Crucifix - click here for larger view
San Damiano Crucifix     
18" in height ~ Made of Resin/Stone mix 
From: The Joseph Studio-Renaissance Collection
Price:  $75.00
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San Damiano Crucifix
Olive Wood San Damiano Crucifix
Tabletop Version 7.5" in height
Price: $52.00
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San Damiano Wall Crucifix
  Olive Wood San Damiano Crucifix
Wall Hanging Version 7.5" in height
Price: $52.00
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Framed Art


  Click on picture for larger view  
Museum Quality Gold Leaf Frame
(Real Gold is prepared paper thin and adhered to the wood frame)
Set in a Linen Liner
Overall size: 16" x 20"  (Print size: 11" x 14")
The print is specially processed to look like a textured oil painting
Price: $75.00 
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St. Francis Framed Art
Click on picture for larger view  
Museum Quality Gold Leaf Frame
(Real Gold is prepared paper thin and adhered to the wood frame)
Linen Liner
Overall size: 16" x 20"  (Print size: 11" x 14")
The print is specially processed to look like a textured oil painting
Price: $75.00
Add to Cart
   

St. Francis of Assisi Biographies

Book: The Five Wounds of St. Francis
The Five Wounds of Saint Francis 
By: Fr. Solanus Benfatti CFR 
Many saints have borne the stigmata - wounds resembling those of Christ's crucifixion. While some of those saints have written about their experience, little is known of the personal experience of the first of all saints to brandish this extraordinary sign, Francis of Assisi. They were and have remained his carefully guarded secret.
In The Five Wounds of Saint Francis, author Fr. Solanus Benfatti, CFR, explores the significance of this miraculous event in the Saint's life through careful analysis of pertinent medieval literature and recent scholarly studies. He establishes the historicity of the event which has been called into question and draws surprising and inspiring conclusions, leaving the reader with a fresh understanding of Saint Francis' spiritual experience. 298 pages.
   Price: $17.95     Add to Cart
    

Book: The Life of St. Francis of Assisi
The Life of St. Francis of Assisi
By St. Bonaventure
"Francis, go and build up My house, which thou seest is falling into ruin." To fulfill this command of Our Lord, St Francis of Assisi (1181-1226) began by restoring physical churches and continued by building up the spiritual Church in souls. Francis' humility, purity and joy inspired many to conversion and a deeper faith. Never ordained a priest, St. Francis nonetheless was a preacher and a miracle-worker of the first order; curing, prophesying, casting out devils, turning water into wine and raising people from the dead. The Life of St. Francis of Assisi by St Bonaventure conveys a picture of the Saint that renders an indelible impression of a man totally transformed by God. 184 pages.
Price: $15.00   Add to Cart
   

St. Francis Key Chains 

Click here for larger view
St. Francis Key Chain
Silver Plated Brass
Price: $16.00
BUY HERE

Engravable
   

Click here for larger view
San Damiano Key Chain
Silver Plated Brass
Price: $16.00
BUY HERE

Engravable
  

Click here for larger view
Tao Cross Key Chain
Silver Plated Brass
Price: $16.00
BUY HERE

Engravable
  

St. Francis of Assisi

Founder of the Franciscan Order, born at Assisi in Umbria, in 1181.

In 1182, Pietro Bernadone returned from a trip to France to find out his wife had given birth to a son. Far from being excited or apologetic because he'd been gone, Pietro was furious because she'd had his new son baptized Giovanni after John the Baptist. The last thing Pietro wanted in his son was a man of God -- he wanted a man of business, a cloth merchant like he was, and he especially wanted a son who would reflect his infatuation with France. So he renamed his son Francesco -- which is the equivalent of calling him Frenchman.

Francis enjoyed a very rich easy life growing up because of his father's wealth and the permissiveness of the times. From the beginning everyone -- and I mean everyone -- loved Francis. He was constantly happy, charming, and a born leader. If he was picky, people excused him. If he was ill, people took care of him. If he was so much of a dreamer he did poorly in school, no one minded. In many ways he was too easy to like for his own good. No one tried to control him or teach him.

As he grew up, Francis became the leader of a crowd of young people who spent their nights in wild parties. Thomas of Celano, his biographer who knew him well, said, "In other respects an exquisite youth, he attracted to himself a whole retinue of young people addicted to evil and accustomed to vice." Francis himself said, "I lived in sin" during that time.

Francis fulfilled every hope of Pietro's -- even falling in love with France. He loved the songs of France, the romance of France, and especially the free adventurous troubadours of France who wandered through Europe. And despite his dreaming, Francis was also good at business. But Francis wanted more..more than wealth. But not holiness! Francis wanted to be a noble, a knight. Battle was the best place to win the glory and prestige he longed for. He got his first chance when Assisi declared war on their longtime enemy, the nearby town of Perugia.

Most of the troops from Assisi were butchered in the fight. Only those wealthy enough to expect to be ransomed were taken prisoner. At last Francis was among the nobility like he always wanted to be...but chained in a harsh, dark dungeon. All accounts say that he never lost his happy manner in that horrible place. Finally, after a year in the dungeon, he was ransomed. Strangely, the experience didn't seem to change him. He gave himself to partying with as much joy and abandon as he had before the battle.

The experience didn't change what he wanted from life either: Glory. Finally a call for knights for the Fourth Crusade gave him a chance for his dream. But before he left Francis had to have a suit of armor and a horse -- no problem for the son of a wealthy father. And not just any suit of armor would do but one decorated with gold with a magnificent cloak. Any relief we feel in hearing that Francis gave the cloak to a poor knight will be destroyed by the boasts that Francis left behind that he would return a prince.

But Francis never got farther than one day's ride from Assisi. There he had a dream in which God told him he had it all wrong and told him to return home. And return home he did. What must it have been like to return without ever making it to battle -- the boy who wanted nothing more than to be liked was humiliated, laughed at, called a coward by the village and raged at by his father for the money wasted on armor.

Francis' conversion did not happen over night. God had waited for him for twenty-five years and now it was Francis' turn to wait. Francis started to spend more time in prayer. He went off to a cave and wept for his sins. Sometimes God's grace overwhelmed him with joy. But life couldn't just stop for God. There was a business to run, customers to wait on.

One day while riding through the countryside, Francis, the man who loved beauty, who was so picky about food, who hated deformity, came face to face with a leper. Repelled by the appearance and the smell of the leper, Francis nevertheless jumped down from his horse and kissed the hand of the leper. When his kiss of peace was returned, Francis was filled with joy. As he rode off, he turned around for a last wave, and saw that the leper had disappeared. He always looked upon it as a test from God...that he had passed.

His search for conversion led him to the ancient church at San Damiano. While he was praying there, he heard Christ on the crucifix speak to him, "Francis, repair my church." Francis assumed this meant church with a small c -- the crumbling building he was in. Acting again in his impetuous way, he took fabric from his father's shop and sold it to get money to repair the church. His father saw this as an act of theft -- and put together with Francis' cowardice, waste of money, and his growing disinterest in money made Francis seem more like a madman than his son. Pietro dragged Francis before the bishop and in front of the whole town demanded that Francis return the money and renounce all rights as his heir.

The bishop was very kind to Francis; he told him to return the money and said God would provide. That was all Francis needed to hear. He not only gave back the money but stripped off all his clothes -- the clothes his father had given him -- until he was wearing only a hair shirt. In front of the crowd that had gathered he said, "Pietro Bernadone is no longer my father. From now on I can say with complete freedom, 'Our Father who art in heaven.'" Wearing nothing but castoff rags, he went off into the freezing woods -- singing. And when robbers beat him later and took his clothes, he climbed out of the ditch and went off singing again. From then on Francis had nothing...and everything.

Francis went back to what he considered God's call. He begged for stones and rebuilt the San Damiano church with his own hands, not realizing that it was the Church with a capital C that God wanted repaired. Scandal and avarice were working on the Church from the inside while outside heresies flourished by appealing to those longing for something different or adventurous.

Soon Francis started to preach. (He was never a priest, though he was later ordained a deacon under his protest.) Francis was not a reformer; he preached about returning to God and obedience to the Church. Francis must have known about the decay in the Church, but he always showed the Church and its people his utmost respect. When someone told him of a priest living openly with a woman and asked him if that meant the Mass was polluted, Francis went to the priest, knelt before him, and kissed his hands -- because those hands had held God.

Slowly companions came to Francis, people who wanted to follow his life of sleeping in the open, begging for garbage to eat...and loving God. With companions, Francis knew he now had to have some kind of direction to this life so he opened the Bible in three places. He read the command to the rich young man to sell all his good and give to the poor, the order to the apostles to take nothing on their journey, and the demand to take up the cross daily. "Here is our rule," Francis said -- as simple, and as seemingly impossible, as that. He was going to do what no one thought possible any more -- live by the Gospel. Francis took these commands so literally that he made one brother run after the thief who stole his hood and offer him his robe!

Francis never wanted to found a religious order -- this former knight thought that sounded too military. He thought of what he was doing as expressing God's brotherhood. His companions came from all walks of life, from fields and towns, nobility and common people, universities, the Church, and the merchant class. Francis practiced true equality by showing honor, respect, and love to every person whether they were beggar or pope.

Francis' brotherhood included all of God's creation. Much has been written about Francis' love of nature but his relationship was deeper than that. We call someone a lover of nature if they spend their free time in the woods or admire its beauty. But Francis really felt that nature, all God's creations, were part of his brotherhood. The sparrow was as much his brother as the pope.

In one famous story, Francis preached to hundreds of birds about being thankful to God for their wonderful clothes, for their independence, and for God's care. The story tells us the birds stood still as he walked among him, only flying off when he said they could leave.

Another famous story involves a wolf that had been eating human beings. Francis intervened when the town wanted to kill the wolf and talked the wolf into never killing again. The wolf became a pet of the townspeople who made sure that he always had plenty to eat.

Following the Gospel literally, Francis and his companions went out to preach two by two. At first, listeners were understandably hostile to these men in rags trying to talk about God's love. People even ran from them for fear they'd catch this strange madness! And they were right. Because soon these same people noticed that these barefoot beggars wearing sacks seemed filled with constant joy. They celebrated life. And people had to ask themselves: Could one own nothing and be happy? Soon those who had met them with mud and rocks, greeted them with bells and smiles.

Francis did not try to abolish poverty, he tried to make it holy. When his friars met someone poorer than they, they would eagerly rip off the sleeve of their habit to give to the person. They worked for all necessities and only begged if they had to. But Francis would not let them accept any money. He told them to treat coins as if they were pebbles in the road. When the bishop showed horror at the friars' hard life, Francis said, "If we had any possessions we should need weapons and laws to defend them." Possessing something was the death of love for Francis. Also, Francis reasoned, what could you do to a man who owns nothing? You can't starve a fasting man, you can't steal from someone who has no money, you can't ruin someone who hates prestige. They were truly free.

Francis was a man of action. His simplicity of life extended to ideas and deeds. If there was a simple way, no matter how impossible it seemed, Francis would take it. So when Francis wanted approval for his brotherhood, he went straight to Rome to see Pope Innocent III. You can imagine what the pope thought when this beggar approached him! As a matter of fact he threw Francis out. But when he had a dream that this tiny man in rags held up the tilting Lateran basilica, he quickly called Francis back and gave him permission to preach.

Sometimes this direct approach led to mistakes that he corrected with the same spontaneity that he made them. Once he ordered a brother who hesitated to speak because he stuttered to go preach half-naked. When Francis realized how he had hurt someone he loved he ran to town, stopped the brother, took off his own clothes, and preached instead.

Francis acted quickly because he acted from the heart; he didn't have time to put on a role. Once he was so sick and exhausted, his companions borrowed a mule for him to ride. When the man who owned the mule recognized Francis he said, "Try to be as virtuous as everyone thinks you are because many have a lot of confidence in you." Francis dropped off the mule and knelt before the man to thank him for his advice.

Another example of his directness came when he decided to go to Syria to convert the Moslems while the Fifth Crusade was being fought. In the middle of a battle, Francis decided to do the simplest thing and go straight to the sultan to make peace. When he and his companion were captured, the real miracle was that they weren't killed. Instead Francis was taken to the sultan who was charmed by Francis and his preaching. He told Francis, "I would convert to your religion which is a beautiful one -- but both of us would be murdered."

Francis did find persecution and martyrdom of a kind -- not among the Moslems, but among his own brothers. When he returned to Italy, he came back to a brotherhood that had grown to 5000 in ten years. Pressure came from outside to control this great movement, to make them conform to the standards of others. His dream of radical poverty was too harsh, people said. Francis responded, "Lord, didn't I tell you they wouldn't trust you?"

He finally gave up authority in his order -- but he probably wasn't too upset about it. Now he was just another brother, like he'd always wanted.

Francis' final years were filled with suffering as well as humiliation. Praying to share in Christ's passion he had a vision received the stigmata, the marks of the nails and the lance wound that Christ suffered, in his own body.

Years of poverty and wandering had made Francis ill. When he began to go blind, the pope ordered that his eyes be operated on. This meant cauterizing his face with a hot iron. Francis spoke to "Brother Fire": "Brother Fire, the Most High has made you strong and beautiful and useful. Be courteous to me now in this hour, for I have always loved you, and temper your heat so that I can endure it." And Francis reported that Brother Fire had been so kind that he felt nothing at all.

How did Francis respond to blindness and suffering? That was when he wrote his beautiful Canticle of the Sun that expresses his brotherhood with creation in praising God.

Francis never recovered from this illness. He died on October 4, 1226 at the age of 45. Francis is considered the founder of all Franciscan orders and the patron saint of ecologists and merchants.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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